Blog

Research around the World

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com.

I have chosen to use the website http://www.earlychildhoodaustralia.org.au/ for my posting this week. I chose it because I thought it would be interesting to see how  Australia’s early childhood programs compare to the early childhood programs in the United States.

Retrieved from http://www.everyonebenefits.org.au/

One of the current international research topics was how all Australians benefit from early childhood learning experiences. The sight gave insight on how collective investments in their young child’s development will enhance their countries economy (Early Childhood Australia, 2017).

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com.

Another research topic was ’The Early Years Learning Framework’ which is a great research resource in Australia. You can retrieve this by going to http://www.earlychildhoodaustralia.org.au/nqsplp/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/RIP0904_EYLFsample.pdf. Joy Goodfellow the author gives insight into the importance of high-quality care for all young children under the age of 5.

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com.

 An insight I gained about the early childhood field in Australia was found in the Australian Early Development Census the “AEDC introduces a strengths based measure of early childhood development called the ‘Multiple Strength Indicator’” (AEDC, 2017). This was developed by the “Telethon Kids Institute” (AEDC, 2017). This indicator complements the information they already have obtained from the young child when they begin the school year.  A fact that I learned from this website is that Australia is the first country in the world to use this MSI. This ‘Multiple Strength Indicator’ shows the strengths of the child and in-turn  creates positive approaches for the schools, lawmakers, and communities to help children get the best start on their young life (AEDC, 2017).

 

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com.

An extraordinary insight that I gained from this site is that Australia hardly ever asks their young children about their experiences in the early childhood program. Instead on their website they ask their parents to complete a short survey about their child early childhood program experience. (Early Childhood Australia, 2017). In the United States we ask our parent’s questions about their child’s early childhood experience in our program however I had never seen it on our website and I thought it was a great idea. It was fun to research this site and see similar results that we see here in the United States and to see research that they are using that we aren’t and why. Have a marvelous week!

Tammy

References

AEDC, (2017). Let’s talk about strengths: AEDC introduces a strengths based

          measure of early childhood development in Australia.  Retrieved from

https://www.aedc.gov.au.

Early Childhood Australia, (2017). Early Learning Everyone Benefits. Early

          Childhood Management Services, Retrieved from

http://www.everyonebenefits.org.au.

 

 

Research that Benefits Children and Families

My son David suffers from severe Asthma and has from the time he was born. He was in the hospital more than home his first five years of life. He was there so much that they kept his name on the door. This isn’t how any child wants to spend their life however; my son took it in stride and made jokes about it as he grew up. However, I will never forget when he was fifteen and had only been out of the hospital for a week and my daughter was celebrating her birthday at the skating rink. David wanted to go and told me that I couldn’t keep him in a bubble forever. He know he could die yet he still wanted to live. I cried and let him go to celebrate with his sister. He had a wonderful time however when he arrived home he was having a severe asthma attack so I gave him an injection and he continued to get worse. On top of that it was snowing hard and it was hard to see when you drove so my husband took him to the hospital and I stayed home with my children and my daughters friends. This was hard because I always went to the hospital with David. The drive was horrible and my son went into unconsciousness on the way to the hospital. My husband was afraid he would die yet he couldn’t drive faster. When they arrived at the hospital David wasn’t breathing and they had to incubate. He was revived however, the doctors said he was in critical condition and they weren’t sure if he would make it. When my son woke up he asked for me and my husband called me and let me talk to him. He asked me to write out want he wanted done at his funeral. He told me that he loved me and he wanted me to be happy.

David made it through the night and his pulmonologist came to see him the next morning and told us of a new drug that was in a research study and David was a good candidate to be in the study. He felt that it was a chance to see if David responded to the drug and could help his asthma improve. We talked to David about it and he was willing to try it. He was on a participant in the study for one year and within that time we saw a complete change for the better in our son’s health. He went down from 15 medications to 4 medications and was able to resume his life. The drug made it through the trial and study and was approved and is today being used on children with moderate to severe asthma as a preventative. Normally it is only used on young children however; my son was an exception to the role. David is still on this medication today and he is the proud father of three children and has a wonderful wife named Trish. I thank God every day that my son’s pulmonologist thought of David for this trial study.

 

My family means everything to me and I thank God every day that David is here with us.

https://images.search.yahoo.com/

Have a marvelous week!

Tammy

My Personal Research Journey

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com.

I have chosen to research poverty in young children of the state of Arizona where I now reside. I moved to Phoenix Arizona this summer and I am an early childhood educator in the Head Start Program. My children and families mean the world to me and I want to learn more about poverty so I can advocate for the early childhood families and community I serve in. I have worked in the early childhood field for 20 years and have watched young children and their families suffer because of low or no income and poverty. It hurts me to see the devastation that families go through because they don’t feel adequate as a parent because of their lack of education and knowledge. They just want to make ends meet for their families yet many times they feel hopeless because they don’t see a way out.

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com.

Subtopic 1: How are young children affected educationally or social/emotionally when their home has more than 10 people living together? This is a real dilemma in Arizona. I visited several families who have their family and their extended family living within one home or apartment. There were mattresses against the walls and there were no more than one or two rooms and a bathroom. There are many emigrants in Arizona and they are just trying to keep a roof over their head and have food to eat. There is a wonderful website called “Homeward Bound” where they are making a difference in Arizona by helping families make a change in their lives from being homeless.  There data for the year 2016 was amazing. They served 410 of which 147 were adults and 263 were children. Out of those 147 adults 80% now earn a steady income and 69% graduated and received permanent living accommodations.  I encourage you to go to this site and read more about their amazing work they are doing (Homeward Bound, 2017). Children who live in poverty are more apt to fall behind in school. Children who live in big households are more susceptible to health related hazards which can lead to sporadic attendance in school. (Driscoll, Nagel, 2010)

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com.

Subtopic 2: Explore the differences in kindergarten readiness between children in Head Start versus children not in child care. One of the sites I will be researching on kindergarten readiness is “Rhode Island Kids Count” where there were 17 states that from the years 2001 through 2004 that developed an all-inclusive set of school readiness indicators to give a course of action that benefited young children and their families (Roade Island kids count, 2005). I chose this website because Arizona was one of the states that participated in the study. There is also a wealth of information to study on this site.

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com.

Subtopic 3: Nutrition

Many young children fight malnutrition around the world. Yet we can even find young children in our own communities that are suffering from malnutrition. As an early childhood educator I even see it in my own classroom. Children aren’t eating right and many times are lacking the nutritional value in foods that help a body grow big and healthy. Why is this happening in our communities and throughout the world. One of the websites I plan on researching is Orphan Nutrition who recognizes the need of proper nutrition is critical to a child’s growth and development (Orphan Nutrition, 2017). I will also research UNICEF USA and their website on childhood malnutrition because they work with families and children all over the world that are suffering from malnutrition.

A few days ago Samba Keita, 8 months, was in intensive treatment of severe malnutrition in URENI of Kangaba hospital. Today, he is completely healed.

Retrieved from https://www.unicefusa.org/mission/survival/nutrition

As I continue on my personal journey of researching poverty this next 6 weeks, I encourage each of you to feel free to share resources and stories on poverty and its effects on young children and families. Each of us early childhood educators has knowledge and experiences to share. I look forward to hearing from each of you. I am excited to continue on my quest and learning how to research and gain knowledge so I can advocate for the families I serve. Have a marvelous week!

Tammy

                                                                         References

Homeward Bound, (2017). Creating pathways out of poverty. Retrieved from

https://homewardboundaz.org.

Driscoll, A., Nagel, N.G., (2010) Paenting and families. Poverty and the effects on

                        children and parents, Retrieved from education.com.

Rhode Island Kids Count, (2005). Getting ready. The school readiness indicators

                        initiative: A 17 state partnership, Retrieved from

http://www.rikidscount.org/IssueAreas/EarlyLearningampDevelopment

/GettingReady.

 

Orphan Nutrition, (2017). A child’s best start. Understanding malnutrition.

Retrieved  from http://www.orphannutrition.org/about-us/about-

a-childs-best-start.

UNICEF USA, (2017). Child survival. UNICEF works to give kids a healthy start,

Retrieved from https://www.unicefusa.org/mission/survival/nutrition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Collaborative Leaning Community Final Blog

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com

Hello early childhood educators around the world. As we come full circle together to this final week of this semester I feel immensely grateful for the knowledge and insight I have gained from each of you. I could go back through each of your blog’s, and posts and share different things each of you have taught me this semester however, I feel that wouldn’t truly justify the impact you have made on my life. I have had an extraordinary eight weeks. My family moved to Arizona, I started a new job in Phoenix for the Head Start Program which I love, and I had this course with each of you and our marvelous professor Dr. Nigel. We are each here because we believe in early childhood and what it stands for. Thank You for supporting and teaching in the early childhood field. You are needed and appreciated more then you know! Have an outstanding fall semester!

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com

Three consequences I have gained about in the international early childhood field for my professional development are:

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com

  • My personal awareness viewpoint has expanded this semester as I have studied and communicated with people from other countries. I have been blessed with a great wealth of knowledge that I have gained with new colleagues that are from other countries that I now work with on a daily basis. As I communicate with them on a daily basis the one thing that stands out to me is that family is important. They don’t care about how much money they earn, or what kind of clothes they wear, or how many people are living in their home, they care about the love and support they receive from their family. I also have a firm belief in family and how important my own family is to me. Yet, many of these wonderful colleagues are separated from their mom’s, dads, grandparents, sisters and brothers, because they live in the United States. When they talk about their family they talk about the cherished memories from home and their favorite meals, or their favorite place to go. They talk about having big family gatherings where there was very little food yet so much love to go around. They talk about mom being home when they get home from school and she always gave a listening ear. They talk about dancing together and sharing music from their culture. I issues and trends I have received from these awesome colleagues is that wealth doesn’t come from money and material goods it comes from the heart. I will always cherish the insight I have gained from these marvelous people.

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com

  • My local viewpoint has changed professionally this semester as I have studied and talked to fellow colleagues about health conditions, poverty, homelessness, and lack of food and water in other countries. These are issues and trends that I have taken for granted in the United States because even though I have lived in poverty and had no health insurance for my children when they were young. There were other resources that I found to help me face these issues. My son David had severe Asthma and lived in and out of the hospital and we had no insurance which was very costly. I found a wonderful organization called the Mott Foundation that ran Mott Children’s health Center. I was accepted and went there for free medical care for my children. The doctor would have me bring my son and other two children to the clinic when they opened and have us stay until they closed at 7pm so David could receive breathing treatments every two hours. This kept him out of the hospital and helped my husband and I not go into further dept for hospital and childcare costs. There was also a food commodity that provided free cheese which was a wonderful staple to my family. The WIC program was also a great benefit to my children and I throughout my pregnancies and my children’s first five years. I received milk, cereal, peanut butter, and juice for myself and children. As I researched and talked top colleagues about their countries these programs don’t exist. UNICEF is a marvelous organization that is working toward helping children have a future. They provide food, immunizations, health care, and protection from harm. This is costly and there is so much more they can do with our support.

Retrieved from https://www.unicef.org

  • My final consequence of issues and trends that I have obtained about the International Early childhood field for my personal development is that I can be an advocate with other early childhood educators around the world and write letters to my congressmen. I can be a voice about the poverty and living conditions of children throughout the world and in my own community. I can volunteer for these organizations in my community to help alleviate hunger and homelessness. I can speak out at conferences and with business people in the community about the importance of early childhood and the need to help all children receive an education so they can have a future. I can make a difference and so can you. We just need to have a willing heart.

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com

 

Fellow colleagues,

I thank you for your insight and experiences you have shared with me this semester. I feel invigorated as I continue forth on my path toward my Master’s Degree in Early Childhood Studies. I wish each of you a joyous fall semester as each of you continues on your journey towards your Master’s Degree in the Early Childhood Field. Have a marvelous week!

Tammy

Professional Goals, Hopes and Dreams

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com

Issues early childhood educators face in Arizona:

Some of the issues we face regarding quality and early childhood professionals are the lack of education and the resources available to fund the overall needs in the early childhood field. In Arizona we have Quality First which “is an effort that significantly improved the quality of many – but not all – early childhood care and education centers and family childcare homes, through a rating system, increasingly sophisticated feedback and incentives. The program also uses scholarships to make early care affordable for some youngsters.”

Retrieved from http://aztownhall.org/resources/Documents/103EarlyEducationFinalReportweb.pdf.

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com

“The government has an important role to create an aspirational environment of leadership for the overall system of high-quality early care and education by providing regulatory oversight, coordination, vision, and funding. Ideally, federal, state, county, school district, city, and town governments and tribal governments work together to set goals for early childhood education in the state in order to sew Arizona’s patchwork system into a cohesive quilt. The Arizona Constitution requires that the Legislature provide a general and uniform public education system. As such, the government should prioritize early childhood care and education, striving to make it accessible to all residents, and the community should encourage these goals and stress their importance. Overall, a more targeted role is needed at all levels of government to create a full continuum of care from pre-birth to adulthood.”

Retrieved from http://aztownhall.org/resources/Documents/103EarlyEducationFinalReportweb.pdf.

As I just moved to Arizona 6 weeks ago I am very interested in the issues that we face here in Arizona as early childhood educators. These are some of the issues that are important in all states however, it is wonderful to know that Arizona is committed to bringing about change in the way they support the early childhood program.

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com’

One opportunity for professional development in Arizona is:

We have the Arizona Registry that gives early childhood educators the opportunity to share their experience and education and allows others to see your job experience and education. “The Arizona Early Childhood Workforce Registry (Registry) is a web-based system that enables early childhood professionals and those interested in a career in early education to find and register for professional development opportunities and also to keep a record of their experience, education, professional development and credentials in a central location. It is also used to manage application and enrollment in First Things First College Scholarships for Early Childhood Professionals.” Retrieved from http://www.azearlychildhood.org.

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com

Another opportunity for professional development in Arizona:

There is also CDAClass.org.  Which is an “online program meets and exceeds the Council for Professional Recognition’s standards for CDA coursework.” This program is available to all interested early childhood staff and the Arizona Registry has scholarships for these classes that if you live in Arizona you can apply for them. Arizona registry also has scholarships to help with education of college in the early childhood field if you are within the income level. Retrieved from CDAClass.org.

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com

Some of my professional goals are:

  • To continue my education to receive my Masters Degree in Early Childhood.
  • Live by and uphold the NAEYC standards. (Found at naeyc.org)
  • Always be willing to learn and grow in the early childhood field.
  • Support my families and the children I serve.
  • Support my colleagues and the program I represent.
  • Continue to research and study the theorists and studies conducted on early childhood.
  • Be professional in all I do and say.

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com

Some of my hopes, dreams and challenges are:

  • Teaching classes to future early childhood educators.
  • Stay focused on loving and supporting the families I serve.
  • Continuing to work for Head Start and help bring joy to the community I live in through service and dedication.
  • Continue on toward my doctorate once I complete my Master’s Degree.
  • Health is always a challenge however since I have lost 100 pounds this year my energy and health have improved 100%.

God is my strength and my refuge with his help I can succeed. Have a marvelous week!

Tammy

 

 

 

Sharing Web Resources

As I returned to the website I chose to study on the first week of class. I chose to research the multimedia of the site http://www.globalfundforchildren.org/multimedia and found “in Tanzania: Empowering Women, Caring for Children.”

Emmanuel always gets a smile.

Retrieved from http://www.globalfundforchildren.orgmultimedia the global fund for children.

 

This is the Young Women’s Development Center in Tanzania.

 

Retrieved from http://www.globalfundforchildren.orgmultimedia the global fund for children.

 

Here the young women are preparing a nutritious meal for their children.

Retrieved from http://www.globalfundforchildren.orgmultimedia the global fund for children.

These young women are learning the vocation of sewing.

Retrieved from http://www.globalfundforchildren.orgmultimedia the global fund for children.

These children are in daycare while their mothers are having vocational training.

Retrieved from http://www.globalfundforchildren.orgmultimedia the global fund for children.

Because of the Faraja Young Women’s Development Organization in Tanzania, this young mother is learning a vocation to provide for her and her child.

Retrieved from http://www.globalfundforchildren.orgmultimedia the global fund for children.

What a blessing this program is for these young mothers.

 

As I explored this website again this week I continued to learn that there is a wealth of knowledge to be gained from this website. Two of the featured blog postings were “getting children out of work and into the classroom.” and “Diamonds in the rough: Lessons from Kenya.” I would recommend that every early childhood educator explore this site. Have a marvelous week!

Tammy

Retrieved from, http://www.globalfundforchildren.org

Excellence and Equity in the Early Childhood Field

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com

As I explored the Harvard University’s “Global Children’s Initiative” website (Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 2010), I learned that Brazil is working toward building a “scientific community around early childhood development. NCPI is convening an interdisciplinary group of Brazilian scholars to guide the synthesis and application of scientific knowledge about child development to policy making and practice in Brazil. It is also fostering collaboration among Harvard and Brazilian researchers, including publication of a working paper series (in Portuguese). Translating scientific knowledge for application to social policy, and strengthening leadership around early childhood development through an executive leadership course for policymakers” (Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 2010). It is amazing to realize that Brazil is taking an active role in bringing early childhood education into their communities.

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com

In Canada, “the Alberta Family Wellness Initiative (AFWI) shares our strong belief in the power of translating the science of child development to inform public policy (Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 2010). This center works toward fulfilling “Two key mandates:

  1. supporting research in early brain and biological development, mental health, and addiction, and
  2. translating that research for policy makers, healthcare communities, and the general public.”

(Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 2010)

The http://www.albertafamilywellness.org is a wonderful resource that has a wealth of knowledge on brain story resources. You also can receive credits for taking this free training. It consists of Brain story certification which is “an in-depth course for professionals interested in the scientific underpinnings of the Brain Story.

  • 30 hours of instruction time
  • Videos of over 30 leading experts in neurobiology and mental health
  • Certification in Brain Story science

Brain Story Certification is a course endorsed by our Curriculum Committee. For a detailed description of the course contents, download the course outline . (Retrieved from, http://www.albertafamilywellness.org/training)

 

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com

In Mexico, they have developed “A series of parallel workshops for young pregnant women and their mothers or mothers-in law that seeks to strengthen the relationship between them and build a supportive caregiving environment for infants.”

They also have a program calledPadres Muy Padres (Very Cool Dads: which teaches a combination of coaching sessions and educational podcasts that collectively prepare low-income working fathers to take a more active role in childrearing during infancy (Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 2010).

“In Mexico, U-ERRE had recognized the value in establishing a centralized early childhood hub and considered an innovation agenda to be a critical component of that effort. In the months leading up to the project’s launch, the Center worked closely with the Aceleradora’s leadership team to survey the local ECD landscape and identify the individuals and organizations best suited to take on a science-based innovation agenda” (Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 2010).

As I learned about this global initiative to work on developing policies and programs in the early childhood field to help children and families in their communities. I was impressed with the wealth of knowledge and education that went into this global children’s initiative and I encourage all early childhood educators to take the time to explore this website. Have a marvelous week!

Tammy

Reference

Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University. (2010). Global children’s

initiative. Retrieved from http://developingchild.harvard.edu/about/what-we-do/global-work.

 

Sharing Web Resources

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search;_ylt=AwrTcXZATX1ZUycAuCsunIlQ

UNICEF’s mission is “Putting children first all over the world.” This statement is relevant to me because as an early childhood educator I believe in putting my children and families first.

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search;_ylt=AwrTcXZATX1ZUycAuCsunIlQ

“UNICEF has helped save more children’s lives than any other humanitarian organization. Thousands of children under the age of five die every day because they lack proper nutrition, safe drinking water, affordable vaccines and other necessities that most people in the U.S. take for granted. UNICEF’s lifesaving interventions and programs around the world have helped reduce the number of child deaths by more than 50% since 1990, and yet 16,000 children still die every day from preventable causes” (UNICEF, 2017).

I learned that I need to become more knowledgeable about our world and the poverty and lack of necessities that our young children can receive in the U.S. that many other countries don’t have and without “proper nutrition, safe drinking water, affordable vaccines”(UNICEF, 2017) young children in other countries are dying.

I want to be more involved in these organizations and help not only the young children I work with but also children in other countries. I have supported children in the past and plan to start again.

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search;_ylt=AwrTcXZATX1ZUycAuCsunIlQ

“Sarah Kauss, Founder & CEO of S’well, Talks About the Water Crisis” (UNICEF, 2017).

“S’well, a reusable bottle company, has been helping UNICEF bring clean water to the world’s most vulnerable communities since 2015. Founder and CEO Sarah Kauss has helped S’well earn the status as a fastest growing, woman-owned company in the country. Sarah talks to us about why the water crisis is important to her and how S’well is working with UNICEF USA to help bring clean water to 500,000 people. Having grown up with access to clean water, I didn’t have to worry about spending my days walking to find drinkable water. I was able to attend school and taught early on the importance of good hygiene and sanitation best practices. Yet, not everyone is as fortunate. Women in Africa spend 40 billion hours a year walking to find clean water. Young children, and particularly girls as they mature, spend less time in school because of a lack of access to clean water and proper sanitation facilities. This means less education, less independence and less opportunity to reach their full potential. Knowing that we can have a direct impact on changing these stats, humanizing this issue and helping others get involved with simple acts means the world to me. By 2019, S’well will have contributed $800,000 to help build infrastructure necessary to create and maintain clean water systems, as well as educational programs to support behavioral change tied to water and sanitation” (UNICEF, 2017).

Sarah Kauss is one of many business people that support UNICEF. She has made an amazing impact on young children as she builds infrastructures to create and bring clean water systems to children all over the world. Thank you Sarah!

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search;_ylt=AwrTcXZATX1ZUycAuCsunIlQ

Other new issues and trends in the early childhood field that I gained was “UNICEF USA also offers American teachers free multimedia resources and lesson plans covering a wide range of global topics of interest to educators. You can find these resources at Teachunicef.org” (UNICEF, 2017).

“In 2014, the UNICEF USA launched UNICEF Kid Power, a new program that gives American kids the power to save lives. By getting active with the UNICEF Kid Power Band, kids go on missions to learn about new cultures and earn points. Points unlock funding from partners, parents and fans, and funds are used by UNICEF to deliver lifesaving packets of therapeutic food to severely malnourished children around the world. The more kids move, the more points they earn, the more lives they save” (UNICEF, 2017).

“UNICEF USA receives the highest ratings for transparency, accountability and administration from Charity Navigator. Of every dollar spent, 90 cents go toward helping children. We spend just 7 cents on fundraising costs, and 3 cents on administration. We are also recognized for our excellent stewardship of donor funds by the Better Business Bureau, which gives us a Gold Seal for meeting all 20 of their standards for charity accountability” (UNICEF, 2017).

“UNICEF USA Volunteers support UNICEF’s mission of putting children first. Our Volunteers are of all ages and backgrounds living in the United States who educate, advocate and fundraise on behalf of UNICEF in their communities. Our vast network of Volunteers have increased awareness on issues of child survival, advocated for children’s rights, and raised funds for UNICEF for over 70 years. “Volunteers have hosted awareness raising events, such as panel discussions, speaking on the issues of trafficking, global citizenship, and emergencies around the world. Volunteers have held bake sales, dinner parties, Water Walks, and hosted sporting events and online fundraisers, raising crucial funds for UNICEF’s lifesaving work to put children first” (UNICEF, 2017).

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search;_ylt=AwrTcXZATX1ZUycAuCsunIlQ

 

As I have researched UNICEF I have gained a wealth of knowledge. They are an outstanding organization that goes the extra mile to stop poverty and hunger. They have volunteers around the world that donate their time to this great organization. As an early childhood educator, I have realized that I can have an impact on my children every day. However, I also can be an advocate for these children in other countries by volunteering my time to support this wonderful organization. The issues of poverty, hunger, safe drinking water are a reality for many young children in our world today. The trend is that UNICEF is making a difference in their support around the world to help bring food, safe drinking water, vaccinations and much more to these poverty countries. These is a great website and I encourage everyone to explore it. Have a marvelous week!

Tammy

Reference

UNICEF USA, (2017). Help Save Children’s Lives. Retrieved from

https://www.unicefusa.org.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sharing Web Resources

NAEYC: https://www.naeyc.org

Retrived from NAEYC: https://www.naeyc.org

The NAEYC is an organization that I have been a member of for many years. You can become a member as a student in college or as a professional. Their website has many facets that bring a wealth of information to both the early childhood educator and the families of young children. I receive emails from them several times a week. The NAEYC has a weekly forum that as a member you can be apart of,. This is where you can talk with other early childhood educators about different topics. It is a great way to have questions answered and to share your experiences with other early childhood educators.

Retrived from: https://images.search.yahoo.com

They have a wealth of knowledge for early childhood families on their family website: http://families.naeyc.org that I give to my families I teach and I use many of the articles on their site when answering my parents questions to give further documentation of their question.

The NAEYC also wrote the NAEYC standards that I have a copy of and use in my work on a daily basis. I can always go to their archives that have years of publications of the “Young Child” magazine or the

 

Getting to Know Your International Contacts-Part 1

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search;_ylt=AwrT6VoeNHVZzHcACFMnnIlQ

I chose to research the unicef sight I found the article “Escaping Poverty Traps” in the UNICEF Poverty Insights Newsletter. I was astounded to realize that “the number of people living in chronic poverty-extreme poverty that persists for a long time—has increased. Between 320 and 443 million people are now trapped in chronic poverty, which many times is also transmitted inter-gene rationally to their children. The MDGs can only be achieved if chronic poverty is effectively tackled, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, and if the target is extended to 2025 to enable national governments and international organizations to make the necessary political commitments and resource allocations and implement necessary policies” (Harper, Alder, Pereznieto, 2011). There is a great deal of advocating necessary to accomplish this goal of fighting chronic poverty. With researchers like Harper, Alder, and Pereznieto we are able to learn about these issues and advocate for these children from right here in our communities. We as early childhood educators can become involved through supporting these organizations as well as work in our own communities to help fight hunger.

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search;_ylt=AwrT6VoeNHVZzHcACFMnnIlQ

What makes chronic poverty different from poverty? “Chronic poverty is distinguishable by its duration and multidimensionality. Chronically poor people always or during long period of their lives, live below a poverty line, and their situations are usually defined by structural and social inequalities influenced by multiple discrimination’s” (Harper, Alder, Pereznieto, 2011). I had never considered the difference between chronic poverty and poverty. Even in our own communities when we look at this definition we can see chronic poverty. Working in the head start program I now see that chronic poverty is real and continues to exist. We as early childhood educators can help make a difference in the families we serve. Head Start wants to stop chronic poverty and help families get an education and look for work that will take them out of chronic poverty. We can advocate for our families and support them in helping them see the importance of getting out off the poverty line.

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search;_ylt=AwrT6VoeNHVZzHcACFMnnIlQ

How does chronic poverty affect our children? “Chronic poverty has serious consequences for children, not least the strong likelihood of suffering a premature death from easily preventable health problems, or lifelong ill health due to deprivations” (Harper, Alder, Pereznieto, 2011). Children all over the world are suffering from this chronic poverty. It is so sad to realize that a minimal amount of health care could prevent death and illnesses that these children carry with them throughout their life. That is why we need to become aware of programs such as unicef and the work they are doing to help end chronic poverty. We also can support this organization through supporting our communities and volunteering our time to advocate for poverty in our children and families. We also can give donations to help support this organization in their ongoing efforts to help children and families all over the world.

Retrieved from https://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search;_ylt=AwrT6VoeNHVZzHcACFMnnIlQ

How can chronic poverty be changed? “Chronically poor people do not just need ‘good policies’ they need societies that give them a voice and facilitate their human rights. Achieving this is the most difficult part of the policy and political agenda –social and cultural relationships and practices are often entrenched. Also, discriminatory family codes, son bias, limited resource and rights entitlement, physical insecurity and restricted civil liberties are all significant barriers to human development and can lead to and perpetuate chronic poverty and vulnerability over the course of childhood and adulthood, and potentially inter-generationally” (Harper, Alder, Pereznieto, 2011). There is so many issues that families go through in their communities due to their sex, culture, and government which can affect chronic poverty. There is still so much to learn about poverty. My eyes have been opened to the severity of chronic poverty and I want to do my part in helping to advocate for chronic poverty. It starts in our own communities and countries. I encourage each of us to ask ourselves what we can do to help these children and families? Have an outstanding week!

Tammy

References

Harper, C., Alder, H., Pereznieto, P., (2011). UNICEF Child Poverty Insights

Newsletter. Escaping Poverty Traps, Retrieved from

https://www.unicef.org/socialpolicy/index_67233.html

Yahoo.com, (2017). Retrieved from

https://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search;_ylt=AwrT6VoeNHVZzHcACFMnn

IlQ